Plea For The Trees
Help Us Save Our Trees
Plea For The Trees ® Louisville,KY 40205



Environmental Study
What is an Environmental Assessment ?

An Environmental Assessment (EA) is one type of analysis required of federal agencies when they fund, approve, or otherwise assist a non-federal project (as well as when a federal agency undertakes a project). In this case, the FAA's funding and approval of the LRAA's Bowman Field Safety Program is the "trigger" for environmental review under federal law (the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, also called "NEPA"). Most people have heard of an Environmental Impact Statement ("EIS"), the most detailed type of NEPA review document. It may be that an EIS is found to be needed once the study is underway.

The EA will look at the "the purpose and need" for the project (see First Draft at Draft Purpose and Need Statement Aug 2013), it will probably identify a recommended alternative regarding trees that intrude into airspace, it will review other possible alternatives, and it will evaluate the impact on the environment, historic properties, and the quality of the surrounding neighborhoods and communities. Removing mature trees, for example, removes visual, noise, water, and air pollution protections from the airport operations, as well as habitat for urban wildlife.






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            Can I be involved in the
​​​      Environmental Assessment?








Your involvement is important!  Once the environmental assessment is started, Plea For The Trees will send out information for you to sign up to be on the study list for notices about how to get the document, how and when to comment, and whether or not there will be a public meeting on the document. It is very important that you participate in this study so that your views can be considered. More information can be found in "A Citizen's Guide to the National Environmental Policy Act, Having Your Voice Heard," by the Federal Council on Environmental Quality.  (See: Citizen's Guide to NEPA.)



Check back for info on the study as we learn more.
© Mike Hayman
Sweet Birch leaves